The New Arab Logo

Breaking News
Lebanon camp demolitions will leave thousands of Syrian refugee kids homeless Open in fullscreen

The New Arab & agencies

Lebanon camp demolitions will leave thousands of Syrian refugee kids homeless

Lebanon allows only informal camps for Syrian refugees to prevent permanent settlements [Getty]

Date of publication: 4 June, 2019

Share this page:
  • 0

  • twitter
Lebanon's planned demolition of concrete shelters housing Syrian refugees near the border could make at least 15,000 children homeless.
Lebanon's planned demolition of concrete shelters housing Syrian refugees near the border could make at least 15,000 children homeless, aid groups warned Tuesday.

The authorities in April set a June 9 deadline for Syrian refugees living in shelters built with materials other than timber and plastic sheeting in Arsal to bring their homes into compliance.

In Arsal, which lies in northeastern Lebanon, more than 5,000 structures made with concrete are slated for demolition. Similar measures could affect other communities in the near future.

Lebanon allows only informal camps for Syrian refugees to prevent permanent settlements that would affect its delicate demographic balance.

Three international aid agencies – Save the Children, World Vision and Terre des Hommes – warned that children were most at risk and urged the government to hold off.

"For a child who barely eats, and often doesn't go to school, losing a home is extremely traumatic. And we are talking about 15,000 children," said Piotr Sasin from the Swiss-based Terre des Hommes charity.

Read more: Outcry after Lebanon deports 16 Syrians from Beirut airport

The joint statement warned that the "demolition of many of these homes could result in the destruction of household water and sanitation systems, leaving children at high risk of illness and disease."

Lebanon is home to an estimated 1.5 to 2 million refugees who have fled the conflict that erupted in 2011 when the Syrian regime repressed initially peaceful protests.

Lebanon's economic and other woes are routinely blamed on Syrian refugees by local politicians and the government has ratcheted up the pressure to send them back.

Follow us on Twitter: @The_NewArab

The New ArabComments

Most Popular

Most Popular

    Read More